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European Countries in the United Nations by JoeFalchetto in europe

[–]JoeFalchetto[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

No, it‘s because Belarus and Ukraine got a seat (so there was a USSR seat, an Ukrainian seat, and a Belarusian seat, kind of like having a US seat, a Californian seat, and a NY seat), the other Soviet Republics did not.

Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikstan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Moldova are also the clear successors of the corresponding Soviet Republics, but they only got a seat after the collapse of the USSR.

European Countries in the United Nations by JoeFalchetto in europe

[–]JoeFalchetto[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Was there a chance for Bulgaria, Romania, and Hungary to vote in line with the US?

Filling your kids stomach isn't racist but rabbi has another view on it by mojo1513 in 4chan

[–]JoeFalchetto [score hidden]  (0 children)

I have never heard of a country making cheese for it's poor people tbh.

Usually the excess produce bought is thrown away. The common part I was referring to was buying foodstuff from farms as a form of subsidy.

European Countries in the United Nations by JoeFalchetto in europe

[–]JoeFalchetto[S] 11 points12 points  (0 children)

EDIT: spelling, also noticed it is UN who has it weirdly written not you, Russia as successor of USSR, but not Czech republic for Czechoslovakia, even though they inherited everything else, wut? why?

If you click on the little crosses next to the names on the website, it explains.

For the USSR:

The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics was an original Member of the United Nations from 24 October 1945.

In a letter dated 24 December 1991, Boris Yeltsin, the President of the Russian Federation, informed the Secretary-General that the membership of the Soviet Union in the Security Council and all other United Nations organs was being continued by the Russian Federation with the support of the 11 member countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States.

For Czechoslovakia:

Czechoslovakia was an original Member of the United Nations from 24 October 1945.

In a letter dated 10 December 1992, its Permanent Representative informed the Secretary-General that the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic would cease to exist on 31 December 1992 and that the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic, as successor States, would apply for membership in the United Nations.

Following the receipt of their application, the Security Council, on 8 January 1993, recommended to the General Assembly that the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic be both admitted to United Nations membership. Both the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic were thus admitted on 19 January of that year as Member States.

For Yugoslavia:

The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was an original Member of the United Nations, the Charter having been signed on its behalf on 26 June 1945 and ratified 19 October 1945, until its dissolution following the establishment and subsequent admission as new Members of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republic of Croatia, the Republic of Slovenia, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

The Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/237 of 22 May 1992.

The Republic of Croatia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/238 of 22 May 1992.

The Republic of Slovenia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/236 of 22 May 1992.

By resolution A/RES/47/225 of 8 April 1993, the General Assembly decided to admit as a Member of the United Nations the State being provisionally referred to for all purposes within the United Nations as "The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" pending settlement of the difference that had arisen over its name.

The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/55/12 of 1 November 2000.

On 4 February 2003, following the adoption and promulgation of the Constitutional Charter of Serbia and Montenegro by the Assembly of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the official name of "Federal Republic of Yugoslavia" was changed to Serbia and Montenegro.

In a letter dated 3 June 2006, the President of the Republic of Serbia informed the Secretary-General that the membership of Serbia and Montenegro was being continued by the Republic of Serbia, following Montenegro's declaration of independence.

Montenegro held a 21 May 2006 referendum and declared itself independent from Serbia on 3 June.

On 28 June 2006 it was accepted as a United Nations Member State by General Assembly resolution A/RES/60/264.

European Countries in the United Nations by JoeFalchetto in europe

[–]JoeFalchetto[S] 18 points19 points  (0 children)

Yes, so was the USSR.

However the UN lists both USSR, Jugoslavia and Czechoslovakia, and Czechia, Lithuania, Kazakhstan, Slovakia, Slovenia, Serbia and so on as separate entries.

European Countries in the United Nations by JoeFalchetto in europe

[–]JoeFalchetto[S] 6 points7 points  (0 children)

No I am talking about Andorra, San Marino, Liechtenstein, and Monaco.

I know you guys had to wait for the USSR to collapse.

European Countries in the United Nations by JoeFalchetto in europe

[–]JoeFalchetto[S] 17 points18 points  (0 children)

That is when it was founded.

The thing that makes me wonder is why so many countries joined in 1955.

And why the microstates rush of the early 1990s.

Filling your kids stomach isn't racist but rabbi has another view on it by mojo1513 in 4chan

[–]JoeFalchetto [score hidden]  (0 children)

Historically it‘s due to the US buying milk from farms as a form of subsidy (it‘s a common thing in many developed countries) and then using that milk to make cheese for poor people.